hear it working

Below are some examples of just a few of the types of user experiences Gyst can provide. Turn up the audio volume on your laptop or mobile device and listen for the subtle (and not so subtle) changes in CX for each example. Further details on each experience are given below the demos.

why it matters

In todays technology-based, highly mobile service environment, your customers expect to be able to self-serve quickly, at any time, and without a lot of pain or friction. It is also easier than ever to lose business to the competition when an enterprise is not continually meeting or exceeding those expectations.

With this new customer service paradigm however, come many challenges for your voice channels. Those challenges come in terms of background noise in mobile environments, distractions in the home or office while calling, poor mobile service, sub-optimal speech recognition, and many other factors. The best user experience will always be one that changes and adapts to these factors on behalf of the user, and one that also takes into account their ability to navigate their way through your own unique voice self-service applications.

Gyst solves these problems by using the exhibited skills and behavior of your voice channel users to drive an experience that is personalized on the fly for each customer.

Given above are just are a few examples of the types of user experiences Gyst can provide based on exhibited user behavior. This is by no means an exhaustive list. In fact, there are as many unique experiences with Gyst as there are unique types of users and calling environments.

Here are some additional details on what Gyst is doing behind the scenes in the examples above...

normal (average) user experience

When the Gyst algorithms determine that a particular caller has normal (average) skill at navigating the current interaction point (IP) in the self-service dialogue, that caller will hear the audio at the same pace and with the same timeout, audio message content and other call parameters as they would without Gyst. This is essential in order to maintain the existing user experience for those callers exhibiting average dialogue interaction skills.

advanced user experience

When the Gyst algorithms determine that a particular caller has advanced (somewhat better than average) skill at navigating the current interaction point (IP) in the self-service dialogue, that caller will hear the audio at gradually increasing playback speeds for every interaction point (IP) they navigate through with that same advanced skill level. These changes in playback rates are essentially imperceptible to the caller - the goal is to automatically tune in to each callers comfortable listening and comprehension rate without inducing any additional caller input errors.

expert user experience

When Gyst determines that a particular caller has expert skill at navigating the current interaction point (IP) in the self-service dialogue, that caller will hear the audio progress at increasingly faster playback speeds for every interaction point (IP) they navigate through with that same expert skill level. These callers may also hear abbreviated audio prompts every time they respond with expert skill level. The intention here is to speed up access to information for expert callers and encourage them to self-serve during this, and future encounters with the voice self-service system.

novice user experience

When Gyst identifies a caller that has poor navigation skills, that caller will hear the audio progress at gradually slower playback speeds for each and every interaction point (IP) they navigate through with that same novice skill level. They may also be allowed additional time to respond and given additional, more elaborate and instructive audio messages. The changes in playback rates are essentially imperceptible to the caller - the goal is to automatically tune in to each callers comfortable listening and comprehension rate, thereby reducing those annoying "Please try again..." messages.

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